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Environmental Statement
To see the Lower Otter Restoration Project Environmental Statement, click here.

Kier Newsletter

Please click here to read the April 2022 Kier Lower Otter Restoration Project newsletter.

Footpath work approved
09 June 2022: Work to raise the height of a popular public footpath west of the Lower Otter Restoration Project site is due to begin in August. This will take it above the level of most tides, ensuring access is maintained in most circumstances.  
Click here to read more

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Future options

What should be done about the effects of climate change?

There were three main options for the future of the Lower Otter Estuary.

1. No active intervention: The River Otter's embankments were built over 200 years ago when the river was straightened. Today those embankments are nearing the end of their useful life and there is a significant risk they will catastrophically fail in a major flood or extreme tidal event. We can't predict when this will happen. However, failure will likely impact adversely on local homes and businesses, expose an unprotected old municipal tip to erosion and threaten public infrastructure such as roads, public footpaths and recreational facilities.  

2. Holding the line: This would have involved building new defences or improving existing ones to hold back the sea and cope with the predicted increase in flooding events from the river. Holding the line is generally favoured when it is essential to protect at-risk homes, businesses and other existing infrastructure close to the sea, especially in heavily built-up areas.

3. Managed realignment: This involves an acceptance that we can't stop climate change, but seeks to work with nature and pre-empt inevitable change. With managed realignment the shoreline and associated habitats are allowed to move naturally, but the process is managed to secure the best possible benefits for people and wildlife. This option is usually undertaken in low-lying areas such as estuaries, especially where land has previously been claimed from the sea in years gone by.

This third option is being pusued by the landowner Clinton Devon Estates and the Environment Agency in the Lower Otter Estuary because it is generally less costly than building new defences, and will provide more certainty for local people than simply waiting for the embankments to fail. At the same time it will safeguard and improve public access and create new and greater areas of habitats for wildlife, including rare intertidal habitat that has been lost to coastal squeeze in other areas.


What will managed realignment look like?

A managed realignment will involve controlled breaches of the existing embankments, which were built 200 years ago and which are now no longer effective. The breaches will be spanned by bridges to allow continued public access along them.  Find out more about the Project Aims.



Future options